Archive for the ‘Spotlight’ Category

September Member Spotlight – Julie Villa

September Member Spotlight – Julie Villa

“I believe local cities and municipalities requiring improvements to the existing building stock will serve as a major push to reduce overall energy consumption and make our neighborhoods healthier places.”

Julie Villa LEED AP BD+C, NCARB, Associate Architect, Ittner Architects
USGBC-MGC Member since 2014
Chair of the Higher Education & Emerging Professionals Committee

Sustainability passion: Green school design: as an educational planner and architect, I have the opportunity to create healthy and inspiring environments designed to be tools to teach sustainability to our next generation of learners. From early childhood through adults, green schools can be a hands-on method of incorporating important sustainability principles into the curriculum, in addition to being great spaces to learn.

Most meaningful experience with USGBC: As the chair of the Higher Education and Emerging Professionals committee, I’ve helped organize a lot of great events and volunteer opportunities, but my favorite are our recurring Community Garden Workdays at Fresh Starts Community Garden in the Jeff-Vander-Lou neighborhood. This month’s volunteer day will be our fourth workday there, and it will be great to see what’s growing in the beds we prepped in the spring. It’s always rewarding to get my hands dirty!

What will most impact the future of green building: I believe local cities and municipalities requiring improvements to the existing building stock will serve as a major push to reduce overall energy consumption and make our neighborhoods healthier places. It’s now easier than ever to design a new energy efficient building, but unless we make improvements to our existing buildings to make every building a green building, we won’t be able to make real strides. I’m so proud of our Chapter’s work in getting the City’s BEPS ordinance passed!

Favorite LEED Project: I helped design the tenant finish for 700 Market, the historic mid-century Philip Johnson building, now Spire’s headquarters, which was certified LEED Gold. It was my first ID+C project, and I found it very rewarding to revitalize a long-vacant building into a modern collaborative workspace, keeping a major employer in the urban core instead of building new office space outside of the city center.

As far as other LEED projects that I admire, the East End transformation of Washington University’s campus is a truly innovative re-envisioning of that iconic end of campus. As a graduate, I’m proud to say it exceeds every expectation I had for the transformation, and I expect it to set new standards for future campus improvements.

Favorite place in the St. Louis region: The Green Rock trail at Rockwood Reservation. Hiking trails are my happy place, and this is a favorite in the region – rocky, hilly, and so very green!




August Member Spotlight – David Charles

August Member Spotlight

“Collaboration amongst people from many demographics will hopefully shed light on these inequities”

David Charles, Resource Center Manager, American Institute of Architects.
USGBC-MGC Member since 2020
Active member of the Education Committee

Sustainability passion: My dual passion is infrastructure and the building materials used to execute it. Over the past couple years, I’ve really become interested in Green Building practices – including LEED and Passive House – that help improve quality of life for its users throughout the built environment. I’m equally fascinated by how rapidly new sustainable building products (for its envelope to interior finishes) enter the market every day! What I find inspirational about sustainability is a universal goal of improving how we interact with each other, our communities, and the greater planet.

Most meaningful experience with USGBC: While first acquainted years ago during my time at the Missouri History Museum, my most meaningful is as a current active member of the Education Committee. As now Resource Center Manager for AIA (American Institute of Architects) St. Louis, I am proud to exchange ideas and collaborate with dynamic people on educating the community on Green Building. Some meetings have gone past time due to our collaborative efforts – the knowledge I come away with is always worth the extra time!

What will most impact the future of green building: Accessibility (world-wide). While long-term global plans are in place, more consideration is needed for exactly where these changes will occur. New advances usually require ample research, technology, and (quite frankly) plenty of money. Most underserved demographics worldwide (some St. Louis neighborhoods included) benefit much later – if at all – from these life-improving advances. Collaboration amongst people from many demographics will hopefully shed light on these inequities and we can best improve the planet at once, realizing our responsibility to be global citizens.

Favorite LEED Project: What a hard choice – especially from the array in the St. Louis region. My top has to be the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum located in Downtown St. Louis. As part of the Missouri Historical Society’s long-term project to gain LEED status for each building (Missouri History Museum, Library & Research Center, & Soldiers Memorial), I was proud to see the MHS team (including Facilities & Sustainability Coordinator, Angela Moore) earn LEED Gold certification for Soldiers! shout-out to the architecture firm Mackey Mitchell for earning a 2019 AIA Design Distinguished Award on their work for Soldiers!

Favorite place in the St. Louis region: Forest Park! Without a doubt!! Especially in the last year, its vast space and beauty helped center me during an unsettling period. Prior, I worked in Forest Park almost half my life and allowed the unique opportunity to form my own special relationship with the gem! It was an honor to be profiled as a “Human of St. Louis”, in partnership with Forest Park Forever, to further share what it means to me. I advise you to click HERE because rewriting my whole story may take up more space than this profile allows.




July Member Spotlight – Lisa J. Reed

July Member Spotlight

“Isn’t picking a favorite LEED project like picking a favorite child?”

Lisa J. Reed, PE, IALD, MIES, LEED BD+C, Founding Principal of Envision Lighting Design, LLC
USGBC-MGC Member since 2013
Active member of the Membership & Marketing Committee

Sustainability passion: My sustainability passion – same as my “everything” passion – is lighting! I look at everything through a lighting lens. Light creates clarity. It elevates the way we experience space. It gives life. Light also plays a significant role in sustainability, whether we conserve energy by using only the light that we need (don’t overlight spaces) or by being intentional about where we put light (eliminate light pollution) or by using lighting controls to only use light when we need it (turn ‘em off!) Additionally, I’m interested in equity and lighting equity issues. If it has anything to do with light, then it’s my passion!

Most meaningful experience with USGBC: Tough question – there have been many. This is an organization filled with sincere people who truly care about our planet and the people who inhabit it. Nearly every encounter with this organization, its members, leaders, and staff has been meaningful. One highlight has been participating in the Green Shadow Mentor program. I also want to mention the Membership and Marketing Committee. By volunteering on this committee, I have been able to get to know a small group of fantastic people.

What will most impact the future of green building: Communication. If we can rethink how we talk about green building and communicate the importance of it in an inclusive, non-partisan, apolitical way to get everyone rowing in the same direction, that will be pivotal. When people come together, we are unstoppable. As the mother of two young adults, I see the priorities of the next generation and I do have hope that the future is in good hands.

Favorite LEED Project: Isn’t picking a favorite LEED project like picking a favorite child? I don’t think I can do that! That said, the 4220 Duncan building in the Cortex District was special because that was the first time I was able to achieve the Light Pollution Reduction Credit, and the Envision Lighting Design team, alongside HOK and the HOK Lighting Group, worked really hard on the lighting selections, placements, and calculations to get it. Now we attempt and achieve Light Pollution Reduction regularly.

Favorite place in the St. Louis region: Have you seen The Awakening II near Chesterfield Central Park? This giant man (a 70’ aluminum sculpture) appears to be partially underground as he emerges from a long slumber. This has become my favorite outdoor meeting spot. The giant is whimsical and a little terrifying, and along with the Central Park Trail, it is a nice little nature/art combo that’s worth a visit. Tell the giant hello for me when you go. Better yet, let me know you’re going, and I’ll meet you there!




Advancing Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy & Electric Vehicle Policy

We are excited to officially release Advancing Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy & Electric Vehicle Policy in the St. Louis Region – a toolkit to help advocate for action and policy in the built environment that will help reduce climate change. We know this toolkit doesn’t provide all of the answers, but it sure does focus on a few of the most impactful and accessible actions – some of which have already been implemented locally.

Cities around the world have stepped up to set aggressive climate goals. Over 289 cities and counties have signed on to We Are Still In, an effort to support climate action at the local level by reducing greenhouse gas emissions 28% by 2025 and 80% by 2050, relative to a 2005 baseline. Locally, the City of St. Louis, Maplewood, and University City are signatories to We Are Still In. In October 2019, the City of St. Louis adopted an even more aggressive commitment to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 100% by 2050. But we still have a lot of work to do to meet these goals – so let’s get to work!

Advancing Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy & Electric Vehicle Policy in the St. Louis Region focuses on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Renewable Energy Strategies, and Electric Vehicle Infrastructure. The City of St. Louis is leading on many of the strategies outlined in this toolkit, thanks to support from programs like Bloomberg Philanthropies American Cities Climate Challenge and the City Energy Project. By compiling these resources, we hope to amplify the City’s work and the work of other local governments to encourage action for climate protection.

Download Advancing Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy & Electric Vehicle Policy in the St. Louis Region and help us work towards a healthier, more equitable, more sustainable and more resilient region for all of us who live, work, learn and play here.

A big THANK YOU to Washington University in St. Louis and Bloomberg Philanthropies for their support in developing this toolkit!




Online Learning Opportunities

With in person events postponed, we thought we’d compile some of the many online and virtual learning opportunities. Stay engaged and maintain your professional credential while practicing social distancing!

Check out this Google Doc for more details.

Know of opportunities that aren’t listed in the Google Doc? Email us at usgbc-mogateway@mobot.org with your suggestion.




Maplewood Richmond Heights Middle School Wins International “Best of Green Schools” Award

MRH MS GSQ award

MRH MS Students Best of Green Schools

MRH MS Best of Green Schools Award

Congratulations to Maplewood Richmond Heights Middle School – Winner of the “Best of Green Schools” class of 2018 – an award presented by the Center for Green Schools and the Green Schools National Network.

Recipients are chosen by a jury of green school leaders and advocates from around the country, and selected based on their demonstration of real change in our schools.

In the words of Jennifer Seydel, head of the Green Schools National Network, “Every movement needs leaders, and this year’s Best of Green Schools honorees reflect the transformative leadership that is needed to move the green schools movement from niche to mainstream.”

MRHMS believes that sustainable schools provide all community members with the greatest opportunities for success. It has integrated sustainability and green practices into its curriculum, including lessons in gardening, aquaponics, urban chickens, beehives, composting and rain gardens.

Maplewood Richmond Heights was also recognized as 2nd Place Winner in the 2017-18 Green Schools Quest Middle School Category!  This is the third time that MRH middle school has been acknowledged as a winner during the five years of the Green Schools Quest – clearly demonstrating leadership and creativity in response to the challenge to imagine and implement a new sustainability project for their school.

USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter Education and Green Schools Manager Hope Gribble attended a MRH Middle School Town Hall on Tuesday, May 8th to present students with both awards. At the ceremony, she stated “It’s not only what you learn, but also where you learn that matters! You have contributed to making where you learn an institution that represents the best environmental efforts in schools across the country. You truly are national leaders and innovators in school sustainability!”

Learn more on Maplewood Richmond Heights School District Website.




Bethel Lutheran Church is First House of Worship to earn ENERGY STAR Certification in Missouri

Bethel Lutheran Church, located in University City, is the first worship facility to earn ENERGY STAR Certification in Missouri. ENERGY STAR Certification recognizes efficient energy use in buildings. With an ENERGY STAR score of 81, Bethel Lutheran Church outperforms 81 percent of worship facilities nationwide. Their energy achievements are due to many years of work by the church’s Green Team, which has spearheaded their environmental ministry of caring for creation.

In 2010, Bethel became a Green Congregation working with the national Lutherans Restoring Creation (LRC) program. Since 2013, Bethel has been working to increase their energy efficiency, reduce their carbon footprint, and save money through the LRC’s Energy Stewards initiative. As a participating congregation, they began to measure their energy use in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, a free online tool that allows buildings to benchmark their energy use. Their initial results left plenty of room for improvement; they found that their baseline ENERGY STAR score was 36, well below average.

Johanna Schweiss (USGBC-MGC), Cindy Gross (Bethel Lutheran Church Green Team), and Linda Daniel (USGBC-MGC) with Bethel Lutheran Church's final ENERGY STAR Application. Johanna Schweiss (USGBC-MGC), Cindy Gross (Bethel Lutheran Church Green Team), and Linda Daniel (USGBC-MGC) with Bethel Lutheran Church’s final ENERGY STAR Application.

Bethel Lutheran Church conducted an energy audit in September 2013, and since that time their Board of Property and Maintenance has been working faithfully to implement big and small building improvements. These improvements include low and no cost changes such as sealing gaps around doors, as well as projects that required more investment but paid off with energy savings, including installing LED porch lights, installation of new heat pumps, furnace, and AC units, replacing windows, and transitioning to a zoned heating approach to reduce dependence on an old boiler. Bethel Lutheran installed solar panels in 2014.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the energy used by buildings in the United States is responsible for almost 40% of our national greenhouse gas emissions. By reducing their energy use, Bethel Lutheran Church not only lowered their energy bills, they reduced the environmental impacts associated with energy use, thus lowering their impact on poor regional air quality and global climate change.

“We are so inspired by Bethel Lutheran’s ENERGY STAR Certification. They are living their commitment to care for all of God’s creation,” stated Tracey Howe-Koch, coordinator of Missouri Interfaith Power and Light, a religious response to climate change. “By increasing their sanctuary’s energy efficiency, they are helping to ensure future generations are able to enjoy all that has been given to us. At Missouri Interfaith Power & Light we believe that people of faith are morally obligated to be good stewards of the environment. Bethel Lutheran is faithfully carrying out this charge and is a wonderful example of the impact one congregation can have.”

USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter Volunteers Linda Daniels and Martha Martinko perform the facility walk-through required for ENERGY STAR Certification. USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter Volunteers Linda Daniel and Martha Martinko perform the facility walk-through required for ENERGY STAR Certification.

Volunteers with U.S. Green Building Council – Missouri Gateway Chapter verified Bethel Lutheran’s ENERGY STAR application. Led by licensed architect Linda Daniel, volunteers confirmed that Bethel Lutheran’s energy and building data was correct and that the building meets EPA’s Indoor Environmental Quality and Thermal Comfort standards. Linda stated “As a volunteer, it is exciting to work with building owners as their facility begins to perform better, their energy costs go down, and they reduce their carbon footprint. It was an honor to work with this congregation. Bethel Lutheran has diligently worked over several years to earn this certification, and it’s my understanding that they intend to continue working to reduce their energy use.”

********
About Bethel Lutheran Church
Bethel Lutheran Church, a member church of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, located in University City, Missouri, is a worshipping community that has set as its mission to work toward a sustainable relationship with our earth home, to follow the non-violent witness of Jesus and work for the restoration of life for those threatened and diminished by violence, and to be in dialogue and community with many in a multi-cultural and multi-religious world, globally connected in our need and compassion.
For more information: http://bethelstl.org/

About USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter
U.S. Green Building Council – Missouri Gateway Chapter (USGBC-MGC) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit community of members, advocates, and practitioners that give voice to our commitment to improve human health, support economies, and protect the environment through green buildings. The Missouri Gateway Chapter serves the community by educating and advocating for green building principles and practices, and believes that everyone deserves access to green and healthy spaces. They run a voluntary energy benchmarking campaign which promotes the use of ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and ENERGY STAR Certification.
For more information: www.usgbc-mogateway.org.

About Missouri Interfaith Power & Light
Missouri Interfaith Power & Light (MO IPL) is a religious response to global warming and aims to engage, equip, and educate Missouri faith communities to be stewards of God’s creation by addressing the environmental and social justice consequences of climate change. MO IPL is one of 40 state affiliates of Interfaith Power & Light and works with congregations to model energy stewardship in their communities. There are over 14,000 congregations involved in national IPL programs.
For more information: www.moipl.org.

About ENERGY STAR certification
ENERGY STAR is a voluntary program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) helping businesses and individuals save energy and fight climate change through superior energy efficiency. Through ENERGY STAR, the nation’s most energy efficient buildings can earn ENERGY STAR certification. Since 1999, tens of thousands of buildings and plants across America — such as schools, hospitals, skyscrapers, retails stores, and manufacturing plants — have earned EPA’s ENERGY STAR for superior energy performance. On average, ENERGY STAR certified buildings use 35 percent less energy and cause 35 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than similar buildings.
For more information: https://www.energystar.gov/buildings/press-room 




Benchmarking Case Study: Clayco

08 28 2016_Clayco Case Study The 25×20 Voluntary Energy Benchmarking Campaign challenges buildings in the St. Louis Region to benchmark their energy use. Energy benchmarking is the key to unlocking potential energy and cost savings. Since the campaign was launched, businesses, local governments, houses of worship, schools, and institutions have pledged to benchmark their energy use! 25×20 participants include Clayco, now featured in a benchmarking case study.

PROJECT BACKGROUND
Clayco has been using ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager to benchmark their St. Louis office since 2007. Using this tool gave them a baseline, as well as the motivation to raise their score. As a result of energy saving strategies and building improvements that they have implemented since 2007, their ENERGY STAR score has more than doubled. Clayco has already met their goal to reduce their energy use 25% by the year 2020!

STRATEGIES AND RESULTS
Four years ago, Clayco implemented on-going commissioning of the building, and has more recently started monitoring-based commissioning (Both of these commissioning strategies are new paths for enhanced commissioning in LEED v4). Through monitoring-based commissioning, they were able to realize energy savings with improvements to their economizer and morning warm up controls. They achieved even greater energy savings by updating their 1994 HVAC building management system programming with the latest 2016 energy savings controls, without any added cost.

Since taking the 25×20 Energy Benchmarking Pledge, they have seen months with as much as a 40% energy savings from their 2013 baseline. This amazing reduction in energy usage has helped Clayco reach their 25×20 goal several years ahead of schedule. They will also be close to ENERGY STAR Certification by the end of the year.

As well as energy savings, there have also been improvements to the interior environment including: greater amounts of outdoor air, faster regulation of temperature to within the thermal comfort zone, improved acoustic quality, and more responsive thermostat control. Through monitoring-based commissioning, potential issues have been resolved before they become an occupant issue. Clayco has been implementing changes based on user feedback, and has enough feedback to conclude that user comfort has increased along with the energy savings.

ABOUT CLAYCO
Clayco is a full-service, turnkey real estate, architecture, engineering, design-build and construction firm, which was founded in 1984. Clayco has over 1,645 employees, offices in Chicago and St. Louis, and projects across the country.

You can view the full case study online here. Visit the 25×20 page of our website to see a full list of participants, browse other benchmarking case studies or take the 25×20 pledge! Contact Chapter staff at usgbc-mogateway@mobot.org to be featured in a benchmarking case study.

 




LEED Project Profile: Lofts of Washington University

WU LoftThe Lofts of Washington University is the latest LEED project to be featured in a USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter LEED Project Profile!

The project, located in University City’s Delmar Loop, earned 84 points and received Platinum certification in LEED New Construction BD+C v2009 in December 2014. In addition to providing much-needed student housing for 414 students, the four buildings encompassing the project are a seamless part of the Loop’s busy streetscape. The building houses a 24-hour diner and a grocery store.

Many energy and water saving features were incorporated into the project,  along with the careful attention paid walkability and access to transit. Congrats to Washington University in St. Louis on their first LEED Platinum Project! Learn more by reading the full project profile.




Phil Valko describes “An Architectural Twin Study,” which he co-led, in Archinect

WashingtPhil Valko photo_3on University’s Phil Valko, assistant vice chancellor for sustainability, and Don Koster, senior lecturer in architecture, have led an innovative multi-disciplinary applied research project called the Green Rehab Experiment. The project centered on the renovation and subsequent energy monitoring of two university-owned, 100-year-old apartment buildings. In the article, Valko discusses the goal of charting a path towards net-zero energy performance within market constraints, which meant finding low-cost technologies.

Read the article “An Architectural Twin Study” here, and learn more about Phil in his Chapter Member Profile.

Explore the USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter online directory to learn about other Chapter members!

Visit the Green Building Experts page to learn more about members who have been recognized for their green building advocacy, promotion, and expertise.