Archive for the ‘High Performance Buildings’ Category

Drop-in Benchmarking Help Sessions – New Dates Announced!

The USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter and the City of St. Louis are holding several drop-in Benchmarking Help Sessions. Attendees will receive hands-on help to benchmark their energy and water use in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and report data to the City of St. Louis.

These events are free to all, but registration is requested. Attendees may drop in at any point during the help session. Attendees should bring a laptop and needed building information

All help sessions will take place at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education, at the Northeast Corner of Shaw & Kingshighway across from O’Connell’s Pub, 4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110.

Tuesday, May 8th 2018, 9 – 11 am 

Wednesday, May 16th, 3-5pm

Tuesday, May 22nd, 9 – 11am

Wednesday, May 30th, 3-5pm

Wednesday, June 6th, 3-5pm




USGBC-MGC Seeks Benchmarking Intern

USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter seeks a Benchmarking Intern to assist with our regional voluntary energy benchmarking efforts.

APPLICATIONS ARE DUE by midnight on Sunday, March 18. Please e-mail a cover letter and resume to emily.andrews@mobot.org. Include contact information for two references with resume.

The Benchmarking Intern will assist USGBC-Missouri Gateway Staff and Advocacy Committee volunteers with outreach to local municipalities and other building owners to encourage participation in the Chapter’s voluntary benchmarking campaign. Work will primarily focus on assisting building owners with the process of benchmarking buildings in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Please review the full Benchmarking Intern Job Description here.

To learn more about USGBC-Missouri Gateway’s benchmarking work, please visit: www.usgbc-mogateway.org/benchmarking.




2018 Benchmarking Training

Presented in partnership with the City of St. Louis, BOMA St Louis, Downtown STL, Inc., and IFMA St. Louis Chapter. 

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On January 27, 2017, the City of St. Louis Board of Aldermen unanimously passed an energy benchmarking ordinance that requires municipal, institutional, commercial and multifamily residential buildings whose square footage is equal to or greater than 50,000 to track and report their energy and water usage annually to the City’s Building Division.

Privately owned buildings are required to benchmark and submit data by April 1, 2018 using the free, online tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. Full details about the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance are available at stlbenchmarking.com.

The USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter, the City of St. Louis, and partners are co-hosting the following opportunities to learn how to comply.

Partner logos

The events below are free to all, but space is limited. Registration is required.

Benchmarking 101

An overview of the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance with step-by-step instructions on data collection, benchmarking in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, and reporting data to the City of St. Louis.

Wednesday, January 24, 12:00-1:30 pm – lunch provided
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education
4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110
View Benchmarking 101 Presentation from 01.24.18

Thursday, February 8, 12:00-1:30 pm  – lunch provided
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education
4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110
View Benchmarking 101 Presentation from 02.08.18

Thursday, March 1, 3:30-5:00 pm
Missouri History Museum, AT&T Foundation Multipurpose Room
5700 Lindell Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63112
View Benchmarking 101 Presentation from 03.01.18

Benchmarking Jam

Get hands-on assistance with energy and water benchmarking in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. Visit event page for full list of needed information.

Volunteers will support building representatives to use ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. Volunteers can self-report their participation for 2 GBCI CE hours in the volunteer category. To participate, select “Benchmarking Volunteer” when registering. 

Thursday, February 1, 3:00-5:00 pm
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education
4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110

Wednesday, March 14, 8:00 – 10:00 am
Metropolitan Square, 9th Floor Conference Room
211 North Broadway, Suite 990, St. Louis MO 63102

NEW: Drop-In Benchmarking Help Sessions

The USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter and the City of St. Louis are holding several drop-in Benchmarking Help Sessions. Attendees will receive hands-on help to benchmark their energy and water use in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager and report data to the City of St. Louis.

These events are free to all, but registration is requested. Attendees may drop in at any point during the help session. Attendees should bring a laptop and needed building information

All help sessions will take place at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education, at the Northeast Corner of Shaw & Kingshighway across from O’Connell’s Pub, 4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110.

 




Benchmarking 101

Presented in partnership with the City of St. Louis, BOMA St Louis, Downtown STL, Inc., and IFMA St. Louis Chapter. 

On January 27, 2017, the City of St. Louis Board of Aldermen unanimously passed an energy benchmarking ordinance that requires municipal, institutional, commercial and multifamily residential buildings whose square footage is equal to or greater than 50,000 to track and report their energy and water usage annually to the City’s Building Division.

Privately owned buildings are required to benchmark and submit data by April 1, 2018 using the free, online tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Join the USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter, the City of St. Louis, and partners for Benchmarking 101, an overview of the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance with step-by-step instructions on data collection, benchmarking in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, and reporting data to the City of St. Louis.

This event is free to all, and lunch will be provided. Space is limited and registration is required.


AGENDA

  • Welcome
  • Overview of the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance
  • Benchmarking Basics: Learn how to use the free, online benchmarking tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, including common issues and answers to frequently asked questions
  • Data Collection
  • Reporting Data to the City of St. Louis
  • Q&A

WHEN
Thursday, November 30, 12:00 – 1:30 pm

WHERE
Metropolitan Square, 9th Floor Conference Room 211 North Broadway, Suite 990, St. Louis MO 63102 

FEE
Free to all

REGISTER
Click here to register online

QUESTIONS
USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter | usgbc-mogateway@mobot.org | 314-577-0854
City of St. Louis  | benchmarking@stlouis-mo.gov | 314-622-3616


Presented by:

Partner logos

 

 

 




Benchmarking 101

Presented in partnership with the City of St. Louis, BOMA St Louis, Downtown STL, Inc., and IFMA St. Louis Chapter. 

On January 27, 2017, the City of St. Louis Board of Aldermen unanimously passed an energy benchmarking ordinance that requires municipal, institutional, commercial and multifamily residential buildings whose square footage is equal to or greater than 50,000 to track and report their energy and water usage annually to the City’s Building Division.

Privately owned buildings are required to benchmark and submit data by April 1, 2018 using the free, online tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager.

Join the USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter, the City of St. Louis, and partners for Benchmarking 101, an overview of the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance with step-by-step instructions on data collection, benchmarking in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, and reporting data to the City of St. Louis.

This event is free to all, and lunch will be provided. Space is limited and registration is required.


AGENDA

  • Welcome
  • Overview of the Building Energy Awareness Ordinance
  • Benchmarking Basics: Learn how to use the free, online benchmarking tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, including common issues and answers to frequently asked questions
  • Data Collection
  • Reporting Data to the City of St. Louis
  • Q&A

WHEN
Wednesday, October 25, 12:00—1:30 pm

WHERE
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education, at the Northeast Corner of Shaw & Kingshighway across from O’Connell’s
4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110

FEE
Free to all

REGISTER
This session is full and registration is closed. Please register for the Benchmarking 101 session on November 30. 

QUESTIONS
USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter | usgbc-mogateway@mobot.org | 314-577-0854
City of St. Louis  | benchmarking@stlouis-mo.gov | 314-622-3616


Presented by:

Partner logos

 

 

 




Washington University Competes in the DoE Solar Decathlon 2017

Guest Post by the Washington University Solar Decathlon Team

The Washington University team has collaborated with leading industry partners to overcome unique challenges in designing the concrete residential building. The CRETE house footings, walls, floor, and ceiling are all made out of pre-cast concrete. The walls consist of sandwich panels- structural concrete on the interior, insulation in the middle, and UHPC (Ultra High Performance Concrete) on the exterior. Although construction of CRETE House is currently taking place on the North campus of Washington University, it will be disassembled and shipped to Denver, Colorado where the team will put it back together in time for the Solar Decathlon competition. Therefore, modularity was integral to design. All the systems – mechanical, electrical, and plumbing – are directly attached to a steel “core” that sits in the center of the building. The entire house can be erected in under a week.

Additionally, CRETE House is not designed to use a traditional HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) system; instead, tubing in the floors and ceiling carry cool or warm water, to adjust the interior temperature. Due to the concrete’s thermal mass, the house can act as a thermal battery and cut down on heating/cooling costs. A solar array is fixed to the roof and generates all of the daily electrical needs. This level of systems and architecture integration is often only seen in multi-million dollar buildings.

The innovative design of CRETE House has provided an opportunity to tackle one of the most important challenges for sustainable construction – CO2 emissions. Preliminary calculations show that CRETE House saves significant CO2 emissions over the life cycle of the house, despite the higher carbon emissions to produce the structural materials. A large chunk of these CO2 savings come from the increased lifespan of concrete, indoor environment regulation system, and reduced maintenance.

CRETE House, as well as 13 other innovative houses, will be on display in Denver, Colorado from October 5-15th, 2017. The Solar Decathlon is open to the public and all are welcome to visit. The house will be permanently installed at the Tyson Research Center for visiting scientists, during the winter of 2017-2018.

Crete House

To track the progress of Team WashU and CRETE House, follow them on their website, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram pages.




Green Buildings Are Better – Financial Performance

Guest post by John May, author of MoGreenStats.com

A study by the Department of Energy found that in green buildings net operating income was 28.8% higher than in non-green buildings. Missouri has more green buildings than Tennessee, but far fewer than Maryland.


The residential and commercial buildings in the U.S. consume about 40% of the nation’s total energy consumption. Green buildings use less energy, improve occupant health and productivity, and lower ownership risk. However, until recently researchers have lacked sufficient historical data to analyze the link between energy efficiency and financial performance because the information has been proprietary.

A recent study by the U.S. Department of Energy addressed this question. The authors were able to identify a set of 131 buildings for which the necessary data were available. Only buildings that met the following criteria were accepted into the study:

  • Market value per square foot was greater than $400.
  • Rent concessions in the building were greater than $0, but less than $3 per square foot.
  • Monthly rent in the building was greater than $6 per square foot.
  • Occupancy in the building was greater than 50%.

The authors then divided the buildings into two groups: buildings were “green” if they had an Energy Star score of 75 or higher (a measure of energy efficiency compared to other buildings of the same type) or if they had achieved LEED Certification. A discussion of what these criteria mean is below. Buildings were “non-green” if they did not meet either criteria. The result was 2 groups of buildings, green and non-green, each with more than 60 buildings in it.

The authors then compared the buildings on the following metrics:

  • Market value per square foot;
  • Net operating Income per square foot;
  • Operating expenses per square foot;
  • Rental income per square foot;
  • Rental concessions per square foot;
  • Occupancy rate.

table 1

Table 1. Comparison of Green and Non-Green Buildings on 6 Financial Performance Metrics. Source: Department of Energy, 2017.

Table 1 gives the results. Green buildings had higher market value, higher net operating income, higher rent, lower rental concessions, lower operating expenses, and higher occupancy rates. The differences in operating expenses and net operating income achieved statistical significance (p = 0.0089 and 0.0015 respectively), and the difference in market value approached it (p = 0.094).

Looking at Table 1, what jumps out is that net operating income was 28.8% higher in green buildings. Most of the increase seems to have come from reduced expenses, with a smaller contribution coming from increased rents.

table 2

Table 2. Source: Miller et al, 2008.

The Department of Energy study is not the only study to suggest better financial performance from green buildings. Table 2 summarizes results from 3 additional studies, all of which found that LEED and ENERGY STAR buildings generated higher rents, higher occupancy rates, and higher value per square foot.

fig 1

 

Figure 1. Data source: Green Building Information Gateway

So how many green buildings are there in Missouri? A database operated by the U.S. Green Building Council lists 389 LEED certifications in Missouri, covering 35.27 million square feet. Tennessee, Missouri, and Maryland are the 17th, 18th, and 19th most populous states in the country. Tennessee has 377 LEED certified activities (48.35 million square feet), and Maryland has 964 (11.4 million square feet). Figure 1 shows the data, with the number of LEED certified buildings in blue and the LEED certified square footage in red. Clearly, green building has caught on in Maryland to a much greater extent than it has here. It’s too bad – if you could deliver health benefits to those who live and work in a building, while at the same time improving its net operating income by 28.8%, you’d think that you’d want to do that, wouldn’t you?

Explanation of Energy Star and LEED Certification: ENERGY STAR is a building energy benchmarking program operated by the U.S. Department of Energy. Building owners enter their building’s energy consumption (from utility bills and similar sources) into a computer database. The database then compares the building’s energy consumption to that of other similar buildings. In other words, hospitals are compared to hospitals, schools to schools, office buildings to office buildings, etc. The program then gives each building a rating from 1-100, the higher the number the better the building’s energy performance. LEED is an acronym that stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. To achieve LEED certification, a building must incorporate a suite of technologies that improve the building’s environmental performance in a number of areas, from energy consumption to indoor air quality to water consumption, and others. The LEED system is administered by the U.S. Green Building Council.

MoGreenStats is now going on break for a few weeks. The next post will be scheduled for August 24, 2017. Happy trails ’til then.

Visit MoGreenStats, a blog exploring Missouri’s environmental statistics, to read more analysis of environmental statistics and reports. 

Sources:

Department of Energy. 2017. Utilizing Commercial Real Estate Owner and Investor Data to Analyze the Financial Performance of Energy Efficient, High Performance Office Buildings. Downloaded 7/9/2017 from https://energy.gov/sites/prod/files/2017/05/f34/bto_PilotResearchStudy-DOEFinancialDataInitiative_5-8-17.pdf.

Miller, Norm, Jay Spivey, and Andy Florance. 2008. Does Green Pay Off? Published by U.S. Department of Energy. Downloaded 7/10/2017 from https://www.energystar.gov/sites/default/files/buildings/tools/DoesGreenPayOff.pdf.

The Green Building Information Gateway, an online database operated by the U.S. Green Building Council. Data accessed online 7/9/2017 at http://www.gbig.org.




Green Buildings Are Better – Health

Guest post by John May, author of MoGreenStats.com

Green buildings have better indoor environmental qualities, and deliver direct health benefits to those who work in them or live in them.


Americans spend an average of 90% of their time indoors. Indoor environments with low air circulation can concentrate pollutants 2 to 5 times higher than in outdoor air. Contaminants found in indoor air include organic compounds (e.g. formaldehyde, pesticide, fire retardant), microbes (e.g. bacteria, mold), inorganic gases (e.g. ozone, carbon monoxide, radon), and particulate matter (second-hand smoke, dust, smoke from fires).

Building-related illnesses include infections (e.g. Legionnaire’s disease), headache, nausea, nasal and chest congestion, wheezing, eye problems, sore throat, fatigue, chills and fever, muscle pain, neurological symptoms, and dry skin. That’s quite a list, and it should be apparent that indoor environmental quality is very important to health and well-being.

Green buildings have better indoor environmental qualities, and deliver direct health benefits to those who work in them or live in them, according to a review conducted in 2015. The review looked at 17 different studies of the relationship between green buildings and health. Green buildings had lower levels of volatile organic compounds, formaldehyde, allergens, nitrous oxide, smoke, and particulate matter.

The improved indoor environmental quality translated to improved self-reported health outcomes, and improved self-reported productivity. Only one study used objective health outcome metrics, but it is instructive. Thiel et al compared results at a children’s hospital in Pittsburgh before and after it moved from a non-green to a green facility. After the move, there was less employee turnover and open positions filled faster. Blood stream infection rates declined 70% and the number of corrections that had to be made to medical records declined 49%. Not only that, but patient mortality was expected to be 11% higher after the move, because the case load became more severe. However, the green hospital actually had a 19% decrease in patient mortality.

In a more traditional office setting, 263 employees were studied before and after they moved from a non-green building to a green one. After moving, they reported a 56% decrease in absences due to asthma and respiratory allergies, a 49% decrease in absences due to depression and stress, and an improvement in productivity (productivity was measured using an index that does not lend itself to a numerical comparison of before and after).

Thus, the data look promising for green buildings. At the same time, confounding factors could explain some of the improvements observed, and the fact that many studies used self-report data suggests that caution should be used in interpreting the studies. Studies using more objective data are needed.

What about the financial performance of green buildings? The next post will explore that.

Visit MoGreenStats, a blog exploring Missouri’s environmental statistics, to read more analysis of environmental statistics and reports. 

Sources:

Allen, Joseph, Piers MacNaughton, Jose Laurent, Skye Flanigan, Erika Eitland, and John Spengler. 2015. “Green Buildings and Health.” Current Environmental Health Report. Downloaded 7/9/2017 from https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs40572-015-0063-y.pdf.

Singh, Amanjeet, Matt Syal, Sue Grady, and Sinem Korkmaz. 2010. “Effects of Green Buildings on Employee Health and Productivity.”

Thiel, C.L., Needy, K.L., Ries, R.J., Hupp, D., Bilec, M.M. (2014). “Building Design and Performance: A Comparative Longitudinal Assessment of a Children’s Hospital.” Building and the Environment. 78, August 2014, 130–136.
American Journal of Public Health. 1665-1668. Downloaded 7/9/2017 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920980.

U.S. Institute of Medicine. 2007. Green Healthcare Institutions: Health, Environment, and Economics: Workshop Summary, Chapter 4. The Health Aspects of Green Buildings. National Academies Press. Viewed online 6/10/2017 at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK54149.




Missouri University of Science & Technology Solar House Team’s Next Innovation: SILO

Guest Post by the Missouri University of Science & Technology Solar House Team

It’s that time again! With the latest design nearly complete the ground is rumbling with the sound of construction as the next Missouri S&T Solar Decathlon entry is taking shape once again. The team is made up of students, faculty, staff, industry partners and a few others. For the 7th time the team is constructing a new house for the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon. This newest house, called SILO, will compete in Denver against other collegiate teams in October. What is behind the name? Well SILO is so much more than just a self-sustaining, net-zero home.

The “S” in SILO stands for smart, represented by a home automation system that enables the homeowner to live efficiently and at ease.

“I” for innovative; the numerous sustainable technologies include the solar array, greywater reclamation, and on-site energy storage.

“L” represents living. The home’s abundant greenery and modern appliances combine for comfortable, smart living.

Additionally, ample sunlight, clean air, and relaxing atmosphere create the “O” in SILO, which stands for oasis. Together, these features combine into a Smart Innovative Living Oasis, the ideal experience for any homeowner.

Cameron Summers, Public Relations Director for the Solar House Design Team and senior in Architectural Engineering shared, “SILO was created to meet the needs of a rapidly growing demographic: couples looking to downsize and invest in their future. “

Jennifer Nickel, Director of Design for the Team and senior in Architectural and Civil Engineering states, “The team felt strongly the design should be centered on couples who are entering their late 40’s and early 50’s where kids have often left their home to forge their own paths.” Abby Clancy, senior in Architectural and Civil Engineering shared, “Designed with the practicality of a farmhouse and the modern, sustainable style of a conventional home, SILO is perfect for a couple or individual looking for a more relaxed, “green” way of living.”

“This has been a two year process and the team has learned a great deal about the design and construction process,” states Mr. Heath Pickerill main faculty advisor. “The experience has proven to be a great stepping stone for their careers in industry as many of team members typically get multiple offers in industry”, says Dr. Stuart Baur faculty advisor and Assistant Chair in the Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department.

With the Solar Decathlon set for this coming Fall, students have been hard at work to complete construction of this house. The team is looking forward to showing of its latest entry to thousands of visitors as well as win the 10 competition areas against 12 other universities from around the world. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends design excellence and smart energy production with innovation, market potential, and energy and water efficiency. Please consider this your personal invitation to join us at the decathlon in Denver with tours available from October 5th through to the 15th. “Come out support our team and sustainable living, and most importantly, learn how you can make a positive impact on the environment with simple changes to your home”, says Luke Mueller project manager and recent graduate in Chemical Engineering.

Follow the team’s progress at solarhouse.mst.edu,  www.solardecathlon.gov, and on their Facebook Page.

 




Green Dining Alliance Benchmarking Jam

The USGBC-Missouri Gateway Chapter and the Green Dining Alliance present a Benchmarking Jam for restaurants, food sales, and food service buildings.

Join us to gain an understanding of how the amount energy your bar or restaurant uses compares to similar buildings, learn about common ways to save energy and money, and explore available financial incentives.

Agenda

  • Welcome
  • Understanding Energy Use in Restaurants: Explore common energy savings measures for restaurants and food service operations and available financial incentives for energy efficiency improvements.
  • Benchmarking Basics: Learn how to use the free, online benchmarking tool ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, including answers to common questions
  • Hands-On Help Session: Get hands-on assistance using the free, online ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool.

In order for this event to be a success, each building representative should bring:

  • Laptop or Tablet
  • The building street address, year built, and contact information.
  • Gross Floor Area (square feet)
  • Energy Use Data
    • Attendees will need at least 12 consecutive months of utility bills for all fuel types used in the building. Bring the number of units of each energy type used, not just the dollar amount of the utility fee.
    • Historical energy use data can be downloaded on the Ameren Missouri website, and requested from Laclede Gas‘s customer service team.
    • Water and Waste can also be tracked in ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager. Interested building owners should collect 12 months of water usage and cost data and 12 months of waste production (volume or weight of waste in all waste streams) and cost data.
  • Property Use Details: Additional required information varies by building type. See the list below.

WHEN
Wednesday, September 20, 1:30 – 3:30 pm

WHERE
Missouri Botanical Garden’s Commerce Bank Center for Science Education, 4651 Shaw Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63110

FEE
Free to all.

REGISTER: Click here to register online


Property Use Details needed for ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

For more details or for property use details needed for other building types, refer to this list.

Restaurant, Bar/Nightclub, Fast Food Restaurant:

  • Gross Floor Area (square feet)
  • Weekly operating hours
  • Number of workers on main shift
  • Number of computers

College/University:

  • Gross floor area (square feet)
  • Weekly operating hours
  • Enrollment
  • Number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) workers
  • Number of computers

House of Worship:

  • Gross floor area (square feet)
  • Maximum seating capacity
  • Weekdays of operation
  • Hours of operations per week
  • Number of personal computers
  • Presence of cooking facilities (yes/no)
  • Number of commercial refrigeration/freezer units

K-12 Schools:

  • Gross floor area (square feet)
  • Gymnasium floor area (square feet)
  • High school – yes/no
  • Number of workers on main shift
  • Student seating capacity
  • Months in use
  • Open weekends – yes/no
  • Number of personal computers
  • On-site cooking – yes/no
  • Number of walk-in refrigeration/freezer units
  • Percent of floor area that is cooled in 10% increments (10%, 20%, 30%, etc)
  • Percent of floor area that is heated in 10% increments (10%, 20%, 30%, etc)

Office:

  • Gross floor area (square feet)
  • Weekly operating hours
  • Number of workers on main shift
  • Number of personal computers
  • Percent of floor area that is cooled (>50%, <50%, or none)
  • Percent of floor area that is heated (>50%, <50%, or none)

Multifamily

  • Total Number of Residential Living Units
  • Number of Residential Living Units in a Low-rise Setting (1-4 stories)
  • Number of Residential Living Units in a Mid-rise Setting (5-9 stories)
  • Number of Residential Living Units in a High-rise Setting (10 or more stories)
  • Number of Bedrooms

For more details or for property use details needed for other building types, refer to this list.

QUESTIONS? Contact USGBC-Missouri Gateway staff at usgbc-mogateway@mobot.org or (314) 577-0884.